New Orleans City Tour: Garden District

The Garden District is a place where romance blooms and memories are made. Visitors wishing to explore this magical neighborhood are met with oak-shaded streets, brick line sidewalks, and a variety of historic houses, ranging from single-story cottages to grand mansions. Its green canopy has become its most famous and memorable characteristic, featuring an abundance of hibiscuses, crepe myrtles, angel trumpets, and bougainvillea. 

History

The Garden District was established by the American elite by the City of Lafayette in 1933, but the name was not officially dubbed until 1852 when it became a part of New Orleans. The Garden District is considered an early example of a luxury suburb most known for its architectural design. The area consists of a variety of homes ranging in size, a cemetery, a shopping center, and a large public avenue. The Garden District began with two houses on each block surrounded by a large garden, but in the late 1800’s it began to be subdivided in an effort to make it more urban. This meant yard sized were reduced, and houses were surrounded by cast-iron fences. Many 19th century mansions followed their lead, as a result, making the Garden District well-known for its architecture as well as its scenery.

 

Today, the Garden District sits in pristine conditions, standing strong after withstanding several hurricanes that have attempted to mar its beauty. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and identified as a National Historic Landmark. A number of celebrities, including actors and athletes, have the ability to call this magical place their home. Visitors can enjoy their day sitting in the shade or strolling down the oak-lined street, soaking in one of the most stunning man-made environments in the world. 

Lafayette Cemetery 1

Visitors can explore one of the oldest city governed cemeteries while in the Garden District. Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 received its name from the city of Lafayette and is the home of a rich history. Among the 500 wall vaults, visitors can find the resting place for several notable people, including the first settlers from Ireland and German. Overall, Lafayette Cemetery 1 contains 1,100 family tombs and over 7,000 people are estimated to be buried there.

 

Magazine Street

Magazine Street, a major thoroughfare in New Orleans, stretches across six miles, running parallel to the Mississippi River. The origin story of Magazine Street’s name is not fully known, but there are two theories of how it came about.  Many believe it received it named from the warehouse that the Spanish Governor built to store exports, while others believe its name stems from an 18th century colonial ammunition magazine.

 

Magazine Street offers a break from the stereotypical mall experience, offering retail street stores mixed throughout charming homes. These stores offer a wide variety and often unique products, including but not limited to pottery, period furniture, clothing, books, toys, and jewelry.

St. Charles Avenue

St. Charles Avenue is considered an embodiment of all things New Orleans. It is known as the “Jewel of America’s Grand Avenues” and characterized by a grand and leafy residential avenue, stretching for more than five miles before ending near South Carrollton Avenue. In 2007, St. Charles was labelled as one of the APA’s top 10 Great Streets, marking its place in history as an icon of Southern style and charm. It has served as a magical gateway for visitors making their way to New Orleans for nearly two centuries.

 

Since 1835, St. Charles has been the home of the oldest operating line in the world, the St. Charles streetcar, allowing it to be added to the National register of Historic Places in 1973. St. Charles combination of vivid scenery and rich history has cemented itself New Orleans tourism culture and making its mark on American premier residential boulevards.

Experience the French Quarter Yourself

With a place as magical as the Garden District, it is hard to describe its beauty in simple words. Visit it yourself and let the Garden District enchant you with its lush green walkways and historic scenery. Cajun Encounters is the perfect way to experience the District while hearing about the details that make it great from the mouths of well-trained guides committed to giving guests the best New Orleans experience. Tours take place on air conditioned buses, offering uninterrupted views unlike any other tour available.

Cajun Encounters City Bus Tours offers tours at three different times of day. The morning tour includes daily pick ups at 8:30 am and offers guests a look into that historic cities, including the experience of coffee and beignets for breakfast.  The mid-day tour begins at 11:15 am daily and offers a complete city tour, including a drive through the 9th ward. The afternoon tour begins daily pick ups at 2:30 pm and offers a full city tours, lasting for two and a half hours.

Visitors can experience an authentic look into the well-known neighborhoods that makes New Orleans a famous tourist destination, including the Garden District and the French Quarter, and so much more. Attractions that guests are guaranteed to see include, but are not limited to, Café Du Monde, Jackson Square, City Park, and so much more. With a backstory as intricate as New Orleans’, visitors have the ability to see a variety of historical landmarks. This includes the famous St. Charles Avenue street car,  the mighty Mississippi River, and the lasting effects of the notorious Hurricane Katrina.

Tour routes includes stops that allow guests to have a closer look of certain locations. 

 

Cajun Encounters works hard to ensure guests safety during these trying times. As a result, tour sizes are limited and tour times are reduced to allow for proper disinfection between tours. High touch surfaces, such as seats and railings, are sanitized multiple times per day. Hand sanitizer is provided on location, and masks are worn by each staff member and are available for guests who wish to wear one.

 

Buy your tickets and start exploring today by visiting https://www.cajunencounters.com/tours/city-bus-tour/  or calling 504.834.1770.

 

Book a tour with Cajun Encounters today by visiting www.cajunencounters.com or calling 504.834.1770 or begin your walkthrough New Orleans by visiting neworleanslegendarywalkingtours.com or calling 504.503.0199

New Orleans City Tours: Tremé

Originally known as the “back of town”, Tremé is one of the oldest neighborhoods in New Orleans. Treme, often referred to as Faubourg Tremé, is an important focal point in African-American and Creole culture, housing jazz clubs and soul food spots. It is considered a place where heritage is celebrated and honored every day.

History

Image credit: https://www.neworleans.com/plan/neighborhoods/treme/

Tremé began as a plantation in the 1700’s. By 1810, its owner, Claude Tremé, subdivided this land and then sold it to the city of New Orleans, allowing several free people of color and those of European descent to claim this land as their home. The city designated a portion of the land as a place for residents to gather, play music, and sell goods. This place of cultural incubation later gained the name of Congo Square. Tremé is the home of some of the historically richest Creole architecture throughout the whole city of New Orleans. The vibrant color cottages date back as early as the 1830’s, the townhouses were built soon after in the 1840’s, and the more recent shotgun houses were formed in the 1890’s.

Not only the home to historic housing, Tremé features two well-known green spaces. Louis Armstrong Park sits on 32-acres and features the statues of several musical icons, including its namesake Louis Armstrong and Mardi Gras Indian Big Chief Montana. It is in Louis Armstrong Park that visitors can find the original site of the famous Congo Square. A 2.6-mile bicycle and walking trail by the name of Lafitte Greenway can also be found in Tremé, nearly spanning the whole neighborhood and featuring over 500 trees as well as several open fields.

Unfortunately, Tremé suffered from damage during Hurricane Katrina in 2005, but like most neighborhoods in New Orleans it refused to admit defeat. Tremé, and other older neighborhoods, showcased that their strength lies in their infrastructure and higher ground levels. Day by day it returns to its original beauty and popularity, becoming an example of survival. Today, Tremé spans over roughly 150 square blocks and an estimated 4,155 individuals live there.

St. Augustine Church

Image credit: https://staugchurch.org/media

The St. Augustine Church that was found in 1841 by free people of color can also be found in Tremé, resulting in it being the home of one of the oldest African-American Catholic parishes in the nation. This church was designed by J.N.B de Pouilly, who had to opportunity to assist with the rebuilding and expansion of the famous St. Louis Cathedral located in the well-known French Quarter. It features The Tomb of the Unknown Slave, a monument for the many nameless or forgotten salves that passed away before emancipation.

The interior design featured inside St. Augustine can be considered one of its most historical notable features. The pew date back to the mid-nineteenth century, and the main altar is centuries old and made of pink Italian marble. Above the alter, a skylight in the shape of the “eye of God” Egyptian symbol can be found. The ten stained glass windows seen within the church were imported from France and feature five male saints and five female saints respectively. While the church does feature electronic bells, St. Augustine also houses three bells that were cast in 1883 and purchased in 1894.

New Orleans African American Museum

While exploring Tremé, visitors can stop by The New Orleans African American Museum of Art, History, and Culture (NOAAM). This museum was founded in 1996 and dedicated to protecting, preserving, and promoting of African-Americans in New Orleans through education, art, and communities. Visitors can observe traditional African collections, including beadwork, costumes, masks, and textiles. While the museum does feature permanent exhibits, other exhibits are subject to charge regularly.

Guests have to option to visit five restored buildings. One of these buildings includes the Meilleur-Goldthwaite House, a perfect example of popular Creole architecture. While the museum’s main operation is located in the administrative building, NOAAM hopes to eventually reopen the whole historic campus. Since its reopening in 2019, NOAAM has seen over 4,000 guests and hosted 45 events.

Take a Trip to Tremé

Experience first-hand what keeps not only tourist but also locals continuously coming back to the place by the name of Tremé. Immerse yourself into the sound and breathtaking views that makes New Orleans culture so unique. Cajun Encounters is dedicated to showing enthusiastic customers the best of what New Orleans has to offer from the comfort of climate-controlled buses. Guests can learn more about the city of New Orleans, including Tremé, from certified tour guides, ensuring historically accurate and educational information with an entertaining twist.

 

Cajun Encounters City Bus Tours offers tours at three different times of day. The morning tour includes daily pick ups at 8:30 am and offers guests a look into that historic cities, including the experience of coffee and beignets for breakfast.  The mid-day tour begins at 11:15 am daily and offers a complete city tour, including a drive through the 9th ward. The afternoon tour begins daily pick ups at 2:30 pm and offers a full city tours, lasting for two and a half hours.

Guests can travel down New Orleans’ most well-known neighborhoods, including Tremé and the Garden District, while seeing famous attractions like Café Du Monde, the St. Louis Cathedral and Cemetery No. 1, and the World War II Museum. Those hoping to learn more about the history of New Orleans can view the famous St. Charles Avenue Street Cars, beautiful Antebellum Mansions, and the mighty Mississippi River.

Routes includes stops that allow guests to have a closer look of certain locations. 

 

To ensure guests safety during these trying times, tour sizes are limited and tour times are reduced to allow for proper disinfection between tours. High touch surfaces, such as seats and railings, are sanitized multiple times per day. Hand sanitizer is provided on location, and masks are worn by each staff member and are available for guests who wish to wear one.

 

Buy your tickets and start exploring today by visiting https://www.cajunencounters.com/tours/city-bus-tour/ or calling 504.834.1770.

Book a tour with Cajun Encounters today by visiting www.cajunencounters.com or calling 504.834.1770 or begin your walkthrough New Orleans by visiting neworleanslegendarywalkingtours.com or calling 504.503.0199

New Orleans City Tours: French Quarter

Considered the historic heart of New Orleans, the French Quarter is known for its eventful night life and its wide variety of colorful buildings decorated with cast-ironed balconies. Visitors can often find themselves surrounded by both the past and the present, whether it be by exploring the reimagined French Market, searching through modern boutiques, or wining and dining at a variety of restaurants.

History

Image credit: https://www.callancontemporary.com/

The French Quarter is also known as Vieux Carré, meaning “Old Square” in French. It is one of the oldest residential communities in the United States, becoming a National Landmark officially in 1996. It was founded in the year of 1718, and it currently inhabit the same area originally laid out as the City of New Orleans in 1722. While founded under French rule, ownership was eventually transferred to Spain in 1762. Although the Spanish ruling only lasted for four decades, their influences can still be seen in the city to this day, predominately in their architecture. The Quarters most known characteristics, such as wrought-iron balconies and walled courtyards, are all heavily influenced by their previous Spanish rulers. Today, over 4000 residents are able to call the French Quarter home, their beautiful homes often drawing the attention of visitors passing through.

The French Quarter and its residents are no strangers to hard times. They have withstood several disasters, starting with massive fires in 1788 and 1794. Both of these, unfortunately, destroying over 80 percent of the French Quarter’s buildings. It was able to recover and stood strong during both the Battle of New Orleans and the American Civil War. In 2005, the city was able to escape the devastating flooding from the infamous Hurricane Katrina, but only narrowly. Due to all of this, the French Quarter is often seen as a sign of strength and considered one of the most resilient cities in America.

St. Louis Cathedral

New Orleans is one of the few cities that is easily identifiable by a single piece of architecture. The Saint Louis Cathedral is one of the most well-known landmarks in New Orleans and is considered one of the tallest and most imposing structures of the French Quarter. It has been featured in hundreds of movies and television shows, making it one of the most recognizable structures to visitors.

Originally built in 1727, the Saint Louis Cathedral is the oldest continuously active Roman Catholic Cathedral in the United States. Unfortunately, the original structure burnt down in 1794, but it was rebuilt and completed in the 1850s. The Cathedral features a towering center spire, which is complimented by two smaller spires on each side and a pedestrian-only plaza entrance. Although it is a house a worship, its rich and beautiful history of design calls to visitors of all religious beliefs and nationalities.

St. Louis Cemetery No. 1

William Faulker once wrote, “The past isn’t dead and buried. It’s not even past”, and no place is more evident of that than St. Louis Cemetery No.1 located in the city of New Orleans. Built in 1789, St. Louis holds the title for the oldest cemetery in New Orleans. Known as the “city of the dead”, it’s stacks of above-ground graves and tales of those who now reside there, including the well-known Marie Laveau, attract more than 100,000 visitors each year.

Café Du Monde

Established in 1862, Café Du Monde is one of the most popular establishments in the New Orleans French Market.  It is open to guests 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, closing only on Christmas Day and when a threat of a hurricane appears.

While it is a traditional coffee shop, there is another menu item that has gained its own claim to fame. Guests travel from far and wide to get just a taste of their famous beignets, French-style doughnuts that are shaped as a square and covered in powdered sugar.

Experience the Quarter Yourself

The possibilities in a place like New Orleans are endless. In a city with adventure waiting around every corner, guests can never fully be sure what they will discover in the French Quarter. Cajun Encounters allow visitors to see first-hand the locations and attractions that make the French Quarter so unique, including the Saint Louis Cathedral and Cemetery, the French Market, City Park, and so much more. Cajun Encounters allows those seeking a more comfortable experience to enjoy uninterrupted views from inside climate-controlled buses, guaranteeing a relaxing, educational trip. 

 

Cajun Encounters City Bus Tours offers tours at three different times of day. The morning tour includes daily pick ups at 8:30 am and offers guests a look into that historic cities, including the experience of coffee and beignets for breakfast.  The mid-day tour begins at 11:15 am daily and offers a complete city tour, including a drive through the 9th ward. The afternoon tour begins daily pick ups at 2:30 pm and offers a full city tours, lasting for two and a half hours.

Visitors can experience first-hand the famous neighborhoods that make New Orleans so well-known, including the French Quarter and the Garden District, but the tours do not end there. Cajun Encounters also offer a look at well-known attractions, including the St. Louis Cathedral and Cemetery No.1, the French Market, and World War II. Those interested in the interesting history that surrounds New Orleans can see the famous St. Charle Avenue Street Car,  several jazz clubs that assisted in cementing NOLA  in musical history, and the damage left over from Hurricane Katrina that is still being rebuilt. 

Routes includes stops that allow guests to have a closer look of certain locations. 

 

To ensure guests safety during these trying times, Cajun Encounters has reduced tour sizes and lessened tour times  to allow for proper disinfection between tours. High touch surfaces, such as seats and railings, are sanitized multiple times per day. Hand sanitizer is provided on location, and masks are worn by each staff member and are available for guests who wish to wear one.

 

Buy your tickets and start exploring today by visiting https://www.cajunencounters.com/tours/city-bus-tour/ or calling 504.834.1770.

Book a tour with Cajun Encounters today by visiting www.cajunencounters.com or calling 504.834.1770 or begin your walkthrough New Orleans by visiting neworleanslegendarywalkingtours.com or calling 504.503.0199